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How do I remove an established Bleeding Heart bush from its established location?

I'm having drainage problems with basement and bush needs to be removed. Can it live in a container or can I donate it if it survives? The root system is not what I was led to believe and I'm damaging roots attempting to move it. Can you help?
Last Updated: Nov 03, 2014  |  174 Views
Topics: Perennials

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Hi Gloria, this might be a good time to move the bleeding heart to another part of your garden.  First prepare the new hole by digging it larger than the projected size of the root ball.  (Later I'll give root ball suggestions.) Be sure the sides aren't "slick" by chopping into the side of the hole.  Then add at least half to no more than 3/4 compost or Miracle Gro Garden soil to the hole soil.  Put about 1/4 of this soil in the hole, then the plant, then water with 1/2 tbsp. Miracle Gro for Acid loving plants to 1 gallon of water (you may not need to use this whole solution in the hole), then put rest of soil in hole, pack down well, water with rest of water solution.  Be sure you plant it at exactly the same depth as it was growing before.  You can also try to divide it leaving many little nodes for the new plant growth.  Again, be sure to replant at the same depth.Then mulch it well to 2 inches of mulch, preferably with pine needles or something that won't mat down.  Keep all the leaves until they die down.  To determine the root ball size, start well away from the plant, and start digging around it, moving inward until you come to a large of concentration of roots.  Then dig all the way around the plant leaving most of the roots.  Keep as much of the original root ball intact as you can.  If you want to divide it just cut through the root ball and replant immediately as above.  It probably will do better in the ground well-mulched than in a pot, so the roots suffer less winter damage. You also might want to cover the plant with a bushel basket or some other to keep it slightly protected over the winter.    ep

Answered by Aska GardenerBookmark and Share

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